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links for 2010-03-26

March 26, 2010

  • Ten interesting principles to consider when conducting recovery operations.
  • I don't necessarily agree with this article, but see it's value and wholeheartedly agree with examining the utility of text messaging. It seems like a lot of the problems mentioned are problems less with text messaging and more with protocol design and implementation (aside from the spoofing). The authors recommend against using text messaging as an emergency notification tool. I tend to disagree, simply because there's nothing else better. I also acknowledge that using text messaging by itself compounds the problems noted by the authors. Any emergency notification program should be multi-modal and utilize many forms of communication in order to hit as many people as possible.
  • I met a colleague the other day who turned me on to the really cool idea of Advanced Practice Centers (APC) Roadshows. APCs function as centers of excellence in public health preparedness and get extra funding to develop tools and guidance intended to support the rest of the public health departments in the country. And apparently they take this show on the road. And you (member of a health department) can go. And NACCHO will pay for you to attend.

    I beg of you to forward this to your friends in public health. Thanks!

  • I totally don't link to Mike Coston's blog enough, apologies around.

    Today, Mike passes along a link from @CIDRAP and @marynmck about how similar the 2009 H1N1 flu virus looks similar (at a molecular level) to the 1918 Spanish flu. Researchers theorize that this is why older folks weren't as vulnerable to H1N1 as younger folks. They think there might be some level of cross-protection (which, interestingly enough, probably works both ways).

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